Show/hide main menu

IoPPN news

Monday 12th December 2016

Forecasting which children will cost society the most

Forecasting which children will cost society the most
Description
A detailed analysis of the lives of nearly a thousand people from birth to age 38 shows that a small portion of the population accounts for the lion's share of social costs such as crime, welfare dependence and health-care needs as adults. The study, by researchers at King's College London, Duke University and the University of Otago in New Zealand, found that just one-fifth of the study population accounted for 81 percent of criminal convictions and 77 percent of fatherless childrearing. This fifth of the group also consumed three-quarters of drug prescriptions, two-thirds of welfare benefits and more than half of the hospital nights and cigarettes smoked.
Date:
12 December 2016
Wednesday 7th December 2016

Louise Arseneault appointed as ESRC fellow

Louise Arseneault appointed as ESRC fellow
Description
The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) has announced the appointment of Louise Arseneault - Professor of Developmental Psychology at King's College London - to the new role of Mental Health Leadership Fellow.
Date:
07 December 2016
Tuesday 6th December 2016

Epigenetics may help explain link between prenatal smoking and adolescent substance use

Epigenetics may help explain link between prenatal smoking and adolescent substance use
Description
New research from King's College London and the University of Bristol has found that smoking during pregnancy is associated with substance use in adolescence, and that this link may be partially explained by epigenetic changes evident at birth.
Date:
06 December 2016
Wednesday 30th November 2016

Most people with depression receive inadequate treatment

Most people with depression receive inadequate treatment
Description
The vast majority of people with depression across the world are not receiving even minimally adequate treatment for their condition, according to a new study of more than 50,000 people in 21 countries by King's College London, Harvard Medical School and the World Health Organization (WHO).
Date:
30 November 2016
Monday 28th November 2016

Liver-brain pathway may regulate alcohol consumption

Liver-brain pathway may regulate alcohol consumption
Description
A liver hormone called 'FGF21' may regulate alcohol drinking by acting directly on a receptor in the brain, according to a new study by researchers from King's College London, Imperial College London and UT Southwestern Medical Center.
Date:
28 November 2016
Displaying 1 to 5 of 514
Previous 1 2 3 4 5 Next
Sitemap Site help Terms and conditions Privacy policy Accessibility Modern slavery statement Contact us

© 2017 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454